FAA Drone Rules: Delivery is out…for now

The rules do however permit unmanned aircraft of less than 25kg to be operated with visual line of sight only

The FAA unveiled rules governing drone operation in the US. Many were disappointed with the rules as, for now, drone deliveries are not permitted. The rules do however permit unmanned aircraft of less than 25kg to be operated with visual line of sight only (daylight operations only). The drones can only operate over persons directly involved in their operation. Maximum airspeed of 100 mph and maximum altitude of 500 feet above ground level.

Software steering the auto industry

According to BCG, the “cost of the electronic parts in the average vehicle will rise from 20% in 2004 to 40% this year

The Financial Times had a great article this week about the fact that as software becomes an increasingly important part of the overall cost of the vehicle (according to BCG, the “cost of the electronic parts in the average vehicle will rise from 20% in 2004 to 40% this year” and “a premium class car now contains 100 microprocessors and runs on 100m lines of software code”), it is revolutionizing the auto manufacturing industry and shifting the balance of power between the auto OEMs and the big Tier 1 suppliers (of note: “Bosch and Continental supply 40% of vehicle electronics”). As the vehicle increasingly becomes a computer on wheels, Silicon Valley giants, like Google and Apple, can become powerful players in the mobility space, once dominated by Detroit.

Uber: America’s next big automaker?

Could the Carnegie Mellon University partnership have something to do with this?

A new report from Morgan Stanley has predicted that Uber is on the path to becoming the fifth major automobile company in the United States. Could the Carnegie Mellon University partnership have something to do with this?

The Google | Uber “rift”?

Also over the last few weeks, much discussion focused on what was described as a “rift” between Google and Uber.

Also over the last few weeks, much discussion focused on what was described as a “rift” between Google and Uber. The latter’s decision to invest in driverless technology by investing in robotics research at Carnegie Mellon University and the former’s launch of a ride sharing app for its employees may have resulted in a “crack” of what appeared to be a great relationship with Google being an important investor in Uber and Uber looking to driverless technology to power the mobility service of tomorrow.

Photo :MAHATHIR MOHD YASIN / Shutterstock.com

What will the Apple vehicle be?

Over the last few days, we have seen and heard countless articles, blog postings and discussions regarding Apple’s entry into the mobility space.

Over the last few days, we have seen and heard countless articles, blog postings and discussions regarding Apple’s entry into the mobility space. There are certainly more questions than there are answers but one thing is certain: if Apple, a company renowned for its secrecy, did not want the world to find about its activities and interest in this space, we would still be in the dark. It all started a couple of weeks ago when “mysterious” Apple vans were spotted in San Francisco and New York.

Then, more news surfaced about Apple being in talks with automotive suppliers and that the organization is working on an electric self-driving vehicle. Apparently, Apple has been on a hiring spree and that Steve Zadesky, a 16-year Apple veteran who has instrumental in the development of the original iPod and iPhone, is leading Apple’s automotive research lab located in Silicon Valley outside the company’s Cupertino campus.

Apple already has its foot in the automotive industry with CarPlay but the development of a vehicle by this innovator with $178 billion in cash is something that has pleased many of those who know that if anyone can create an entirely new vision of mobility, it’s Apple. And, according to news reports from this week, we will not have to wait long as it appears that targeted vehicle production is 2020.

 

Photo : Claycord

Consumer interest in SDCs

While numerous studies have been indicated consumer fear of SDCs, one study among UK motorists concluded that 59% of car buyers would buy an SDC.

While numerous studies have been indicated consumer fear of SDCs, one study among UK motorists concluded that 59% of car buyers would buy an SDC.

Meanwhile, a study by Carnegie Mellon reveals that the self-driving preferences of millenials and baby boomers are “miles apart”. While assessing consumer preferences about this technology is interesting, we shouldn’t fall into the trap of asking consumers to state what they want from a technology they hardly understand. Could consumers have stated what they expected from a smart phone before the iPhone was introduced?

Photo :Steve Lagreca / Shutterstock.com

Construction upheaval

Komatsu, the world’s no. 2 construction equipment manufacturer, has announced a new business: SmartConstruction.

Komatsu, the world’s no. 2 construction equipment manufacturer, has announced a new business: SmartConstruction. Using construction machinery equipped with Intelligent Machine Control technology alongside drones, the goal is to automate pre-foundation work job sites and monitor them from a central location. The machines are expected to be leased.

US Government looking to the future of mobility

Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx introduced the US Government’s look at next thirty years of mobility

Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx introduced the US Government’s look at next thirty years of mobility, Beyond Traffic 2045: Trends and Choices, at Google’s headquarters. Foxx’s decision to introduce this report in Silicon Valley, instead of Washington DC or Detroit is telling of where mobility is headed.

Sharing …Audi style

Audi’s Unite program allows up to four people to share a car for up to two years.

Audi’s Unite program allows up to four people to share a car for up to two years. Insurance, maintenance, seasonal tire changes, monthly cleaning and customer support are included in a monthly fee. Packaging mobility may be interesting to a larger audience.