CA DMV: Delay in delivery of 1st set of rules for deployment of driverless vehicles

The California Department of Motor Vehicles missed its 2014 year end deadline to adopt new rules for driverless vehicles

The California Department of Motor Vehicles missed its 2014 year end deadline to adopt new rules for driverless vehicles. The reason: regulators need to figure out how they’ll know whether these vehicles are safe. DMV has “three options: It could follow the current U.S. system, in which manufacturers self-certify their vehicles; it could opt for a European system, in which independent companies verify safety; or the state could (implausibly) get into the testing business.”

Auto manufacturer nightmare: shared, driverless vehicles

If we moved to a system of shared driverless vehicles, we would eliminate 9 out of 10 cars.

University of Texas researchers published a report concluding that if we moved to a system of shared driverless vehicles, we would eliminate 9 out of 10 cars. While this is a hypothetical cab-like service based in Austin, Texas, it is not difficult to believe that such of a fleet of on-demand mobility services, ideally integrated within a multimodal system, could eliminate most cars on the road. Don’t forget, the average utilization rate of personally owned vehicles stands at about 4%.

If we eliminate our home expenses (don’t forget, your house is an investment that increases in value over time), the car is  often our greatest expense: very high for such a low utilization rate.

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