Ridesharing

Ridesharing now represents 11% of ground transportation used on business trips.

A recent study by the Global Business Travel Association revealed that while rental cars and taxis remain the most common forms of ground transportation used on business trips (36% and 24% respectively), ride sharing companies represent 11% of the market, just behind chauffeured transportation (13%).

Google’s Waze is testing a ridesharing service. Dubbed RideWith, the service will allow commuters to carpool and it’s starting the implementation in Israel. Should Uber be worried about the potential entry of what may be a formidable competitor?

In Ontario, a class-action lawsuit has been filed against Uber X, Uber XL on behalf of taxi and limo drivers, owners and brokers. Meanwhile, Alberta’s Superintendent of Insurance and the IBAO have warned Uber drivers to get more insurance.

The Waterloo region is the first one in Ontario to regulate ride sharing. “Under the new bylaw all Uber drivers would be required to have an auxiliary taxi driver licence, issued by the region. To be applicable for the licence, drivers would be required to have a GPS and a closed circuit television system installed in their vehicles, and commercial auto insurance policies for a minimum of $2 million.”

Ride-sharing insurance

Allstate has joined the growing list of US carriers offering ride-sharing insurance and GEICO announced it is bringing end-to-end ride-share insurance to Texas.

Allstate has joined the growing list of US carriers offering ride-sharing insurance. The company’s Ride for Hire policy will “cost $15 to $20 per year on average and will provide coverage for drivers who have accidents while on the way to pick up new fares. It said it can also help them deal with gaps in coverage between their own auto insurance and policies offered by the ride-hailing companies. »

GEICO announced it is bringing end-to-end ride-share insurance to Texas. The company first introduced its ridesharing product in Virginia and Maryland. The company claims its market share is growing rapidly in both these states. “GEICO offers ridesharing coverage through GEICO Commercial at a price significantly lower than taxi and commercial rates. “

 

Photo by: Alfredo Mendez, via Flickr  CC BY 2.0

Sharing: friend or foe of public transit?

As we move further towards fully driverless technology, the transit model requires rethinking.

Much has been written about ride sharing and car sharing and their impacts on the use of public transit. Many in the public transit space consider these mobility services as competitors. However, these services are complementary to public transit. “Sharing” may actually result in an increase in public transit use. Why? As we increase the number of mobility options (including transit, walking, biking, ride sharing, car sharing, etc), we decrease the need for vehicle ownership. As vehicle ownership declines, the rest of these forms of mobility get to be used. The more integrated these forms are and the greater the access of information regarding options that users have, the greater the possibility that they will be used. Tomorrow’s mobility will certainly be different from that of today and transit has an opportunity to carve a relevant spot for itself. The question is will transit properties seize the opportunity and plan for remaining relevant?

As we move further towards fully driverless technology, the transit model requires rethinking. Are transit agencies avoiding the subject as a way to appease unions or are they being honest with stakeholders, inviting them into a constructive discussion to ensure transit survives into the driverless era where self-driving vehicles may become public property?